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Saturday, June 9

  1. page Video News Views edited {Video_News_Views.jpg} ... the video. There will be much talk Find a story about pardons in…
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    the video. There will be much talkFind a story about pardons in the news this week about Trump meeting with the leader of North Korea. Check the news fornews. Why do you think the latest developments.president would want to pardon a deceased man who no longer has a conviction on his record?
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    9:45 am
  2. page Page One Prime edited ... The first page of a newspaper is “prime” real estate. It’s where the most important stories ar…
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    The first page of a newspaper is “prime” real estate. It’s where the most important stories are often found. That’s why it’s helpful to understand what’s behind those stories – because they matter. In some cases, a news story may not receive much attention but it matters because it's interesting. Those, too, are prime stories.
    Here’s some background on a “prime” story this week.
    First Lady?
    While she's not an elected official,
    Summit?
    There has been a great deal of talk and speculation about
    the jobJune 12 summit of a First Lady, wife to a president, is not an easy one. People scrutinize her every wordDonald Trump and move. They watch and comment on what she wears. They expect herthe leader of North Korea, Kim Jong Un. It will continue to lead an exemplary life, that is to live in a way that is a good role model for others.
    Melania Trump is the First Lady currently. She does not
    make many public appearances or speeches. She has announced her signature program, "Be Best," but so far has not exactly shown how she plans to put that into action. For the last three weeks, she hasn't been seen in public. It was reported that she had minor surgerynews before and was recuperating but no one has seen her since that time, despite reports that she is fine. It is unusual for a First Lady to be out oflong after this meeting takes place. Find the public eye for an extended period of time like this.
    So, you can imagine there is much speculation
    stories about where she isthe summit and what she is doing. Keep your eye onkeep track of how the news to see where Melania turns upchanges before and what she says about where she's been.
    Why do
    after the event. Do you think this story makes news? the summit will have a lasting impact on the world?
    How and why?

    Copyright Hot Topics Hot Serials. No portions may be distributed digitally without permission.
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    9:42 am
  3. page Newsie K-3 edited ... {NewsFish.jpg} Hi! I'm reading the news. I like to know what is going on in the world. Fin…
    ...
    {NewsFish.jpg}
    Hi! I'm reading the news. I like to know what is going on in the world.
    Find three headlines in today's news thatSummer is a great time to do things you can read. Read them aloud todo during other seasons.
    Find
    a partner.photo of a person doing something that most people only do in the summer. Write a story about what is happening in the picture.
    Copyright Hot Topics Hot Serials. No portions may be distributed digitally without permission.
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    9:40 am
  4. page Write the News edited {Write_the_News_Logo.jpg} Topic: Help Wanted With summer fast approaching, many teens may be …
    {Write_the_News_Logo.jpg}
    Topic: Help Wanted
    With summer fast approaching, many teens may be looking for summer jobs. When searching for a job it’s helpful to know how
    Fiction From Fact
    If you were going
    to write a resume. Look through today's newspapershort fictional story based on a news story, how would it be different? Here's a challenge: Skim the news and choose from the Help Wanted adsan interesting story that would be a jobgood background for whicha fiction piece. Rewrite the story you someday hopechose, adding details to be qualified. Think aboutfictionalize the qualifications you would havetruth. If you’d like to have in order to get that job. List all of the qualifications you need and then check those you already possess. Imagine that you have completed preparing all the ones you need and writeuse a resume for yourself.
    A resume needs
    story map to includeplan your personal information (name, age address and phone number) your educational background, your employment history and references. (People who knowtale, you that will say good things about you.) A resume is oftencan click the first thing a potential employer will look at in deciding whether to hire you.link below. Have fun making stories out of real life! http://www.readwritethink.org/materials/storymap/
    Copyright Hot Topics Hot Serials. No portions may be distributed digitally without permission.
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    9:39 am
  5. page Lesson Plans edited {Lesson_Plans_A_La_Mode.jpg} Engage students with this week's news, events, and anniversaries. …
    {Lesson_Plans_A_La_Mode.jpg}
    Engage students with this week's news, events, and anniversaries.
    June 4-10,11-22, 2018
    Language Arts
    1. Ask your students if they enjoy watching cartoons and reading comic strips. What makes those oftenFather's Day is celebrated annually on the third Sunday in June so engaging are the characters involved. Tell students that Donald Duck was “born” ondate changes each year. This year it’s June 9, 1934. How17th. What words would they describe his character? Ask them to write a brief character sketch of Donald and once they understand the concept, have them choose a comic strip character from today’s news and to write a character sketch of their choice. Ifyour students would enjoy creating their own comic strips, have them click on this linkuse to visitdescribe a free website where they can create strips.
    Common Core Standard: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience
    2. Author Charles Dickens died on June 9, 1870 but clearly his works live on. According to the editors of the American Book Review, Dickens’ opening line from the novel, “A Tale of Two Cities” ranks 9th among the all-time great opening novel lines. It is, “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair.” Read it to
    good dad? Can your students and then invite them to find the best opening linean example of any storya good father in today’s news. See the rest of the best lines list here. And, by the way, Dickens also holds the #20 spot for the opening line of David Copperfield.
    Common Core Standard: Orient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally
    3. This time of year there are many graduations. Some of those feature a famous person as a commencement speaker. Ask students to imagine
    news? If they could meet that man, what would they have been askedsay to givehim about what makes him a commencement speech this week. Their assignment is to use today’s news as a springboard for information they’d like graduates to think about as they move forward in their lives.good parent?
    Common Core Standard: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences
    2. In one of his most well known speeches on June 16, 1858, Abraham Lincoln said, "A house divided against itself cannot stand. I believe this government cannot endure, permanently, half slave and half free. I do not expect the Union to be dissolved — I do not expect the house to fall — but I do expect it will cease to be divided. It will become all one thing or all the other.” He gave this speech when accepting the nomination for Senator from Illinois. He lost that election, but the speech lives on. That famous phrase about the divided house comes from the Bible that says, "Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to desolation; and every city or house divided against itself shall not stand." So, Lincoln may not have been original but the speech proved very powerful. If your students were going to write a speech about a current event, what famous phrase can they think of that they would weave into a speech? Also, using that Bible quote as a springboard, Lincoln demonstrated the correct method for using someone else's words without plagiarizing. He took the words and restated them in his own way, rather than just copying. It may be good practice for your students to choose two paragraphs from a news story and restate them sufficiently so they could use the information but would not be plagiarizing the work.
    Common Core Standard: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text
    3. Baseball great Lou Gehrig’s birthday is June 19. Your students may never have heard of him but they are sure to find his story compelling and inspiring. Share these facts. Gehrig attended Columbia University on a football scholarship but ultimately ended up playing professional baseball for the New York Yankees, beginning in 1925. During his career he broke several records and became an American hero for his athletic prowess. He and Babe Ruth were constantly making news and they both became legendary. But, they had a falling out and didn’t speak for many years. During the 1939 season, Gehrig began to have trouble playing the game he loved. He was diagnosed with a very rare disease, ALS, now known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. His prognosis was not good, as his body would continue to lose motor ability. He would never play ball again and the disease would kill him within a few years. So, his team decided to declare a “Lou Gehrig Appreciation Day” on July 4, 1939. More than 62,000 fans sat in rapt attention in the stands as Gehrig gave a short speech. In it, he said that he considered himself “the luckiest man on Earth.” He said that the opportunity to play the game he loved with the teammates he revered made his life a blessing. Thousands in the stands were moved to tears and even Babe Ruth stepped out on the field to hug his former teammate and rival. It is still considered to be one of the most poignant moments in sports history.
    Invite your students to click on this link to watch a two-minute video of the speech.
    Gehrig’s story helped people put their own problems and lives in perspective. Ask your students to talk about how learning a story like this one might inspire them to keep going when times get tough. Ask, “Does it help you cope with your problems when you read about how others do so?” Invite your students to find someone in the news whom they think could be helped by an inspirational story like Gehrig’s. Have them write that person a letter with encouraging words.
    Finally, as a follow-up, Gehrig closed his speech by saying, “So I close in saying that I may have had a tough break, but I have an awful lot to live for.” What do your students think he meant? Who in today’s news would they guess have the most to live for?
    Common Core Standard: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences
    4. You can help students analyze literature by leading them through a discussion of what makes a good comic strip. Begin by having the class look at the strips and ask which ones they like to read. Then discuss the key elements. Begin with the dialogue. What do the words tell the reader about the scene? What kinds of backgrounds make good scenes? Why? What props are the characters interacting with? How are the scenes in the panels connected to each other? Invite students to create their own strips. A good follow up to this is to have them create comic strips about books they’ve read. It’s a terrific alternative to book reports.
    If your students enjoy comic books, they may want to learn more about their history. They can read about them at this link.
    Common Core Standard: utilizing diverse forms of media
    5. Ask your students what they know about the types of writing found in a newspaper. Write on the board what they share. Then ask them to choose one newspaper article – a news story about a current event -- to examine in detail. Explain that most news stories are written in the expository style. This is also the style in which students throughout high school and college will usually have to write. In order to understand the style better, have them answer these questions about the writing and the writing style in the news article they chose.
    How many paragraphs? How many sentences, on average, in each paragraph? Who is the story about and what is one thing you learned about that person? What is the story about and what is one thing you learned about the event?
    Common Core Standard: analyze development of text
    If students were going to write a short fictional story based on the news story they chose, how would it be different? Challenge them to write that story as a follow up to this activity. If they’d like to use a story map to plan their story, they can click here.
    Common Core Standard: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience

    Math
    1. One sport that your students might enjoy duringStudents can determine the summerratio of sales jobs to factory jobs in the Classified ads. Which would be easier to get? Which do they think pay more? During an economic period like the one we’re in, which field do they think is bicycle riding. Have them brainstormmore lucrative?
    Common Core Standard: using authentic data, making inferences
    2. Send students to the weather information in the news. They can select 10 cities listed, write the high temperatures for each
    and list allthen find the mean, median and mode.
    Common Core Standard: using authentic data
    3. One result
    of the ways they stay saferecent economy is that many people have lost their homes to foreclosure. Explain to students that when they ride a bike.homeowner is unable to pay the mortgage, the bank or mortgage lender may take back ownership of the home. Then, invite thembanks own the homes and have to go shoppingresell them, often at a very low price. Have students look carefully at the Homes for Sale ads and scan for bikes in the Classified ads. Tell them to imagineword “foreclosure.” If they find a home advertised as a foreclosure, have $1000 to spendthem compare and contrast its price and needfeatures to buy two bicycles. Which bikes willa similar home not shown as a foreclosure. What conclusions can they buy? Why? How much money will they have left over?draw?
    Common Core Standard: using authentic data
    2. Summer often brings a large number of garage sales. But, other folks sell their “preowned” items via an ad in the Classified section. Ask students to check out how much an ad costs and then write one to sell something they own that could be used in the summer. If they ran their ad for two weeks, what would the cost be? How much would they make selling the item once they paid for the ad?
    Common Core Standard: creating and solving word problems

    Science Literacy
    1. YourExplain to students have probably heard U.S. Postal Service mail described as "snail mail" because it is delivered slowlythat Valentina Tereshkova became the first woman in comparison with email, which is instantaneous. But,space on June 16, 1963. Invite them to imagine that they have just arrived on Earth from space. If they looked only at today’s news, what would they heardthink of "missile mail"? OnEarthlings? They should write a report back to their space commander telling what life on Earth is like.
    Common Core Standard: writing narratives
    2. Begin by asking students what the know about Galileo. Allow time for answers to be shared. Then explain that on
    June 8, 1959,22, 1633, the USPSbrilliant scientist was sentenced by the Vatican as he was convicted of teaching about Copernicus who believed that the Sun and not the Earth was the Departmentcenter of Defense worked together to send mail onthe universe. As the Vatican believed that the Bible contradicted that theory, he was committing a missile from Virginiacrime against the Catholic Church with these beliefs. The trial represented a debate between church officials and scientists. That debate still rages today. Invite students to Florida. Although atidentify science stories in the time they thought this fast delivery mightnews that could be opposed to religious beliefs. They should write about the futurestories they chose.
    Common Core Standard: drawing conclusions from text
    3. Tell students that science fiction is a genre in which stories are made up but are woven with facts
    of mail, it turned outreal science. They may involve some truth in the world of science theory. Which article in today’s news do your students think lends itself to bebeing a one-time only shot. Itwork of science fiction? Why? Allow time for a discussion. Award-winning writer Ray Bradbury is best known for his work in fantasy, science fiction and horror. His most famous work was too expensive. Of course, nowadays, email makes it possible to deliver mail faster than any missile could. Just for fun, challenge students to look through the news fornovel Fahrenheit 451, originally written as a problem that could be solved by usingshort story. He said he read and wrote throughout his childhood. He especially loved the work of Edgar Allen Poe. Once he started writing, he wrote virtually every day. He never attended college, but he spent hours in libraries and was an existing pieceavid reader. He said science fiction is "a depiction of technologythe real." As such, which story in today's newspaper would do your students think would make the best plot for a new way.
    Common
    science fiction story based on something real? Have them write an outline of the story they would write.
    Common
    Core Standard: Write informative/explanatory textsProduce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to examinetask, purpose, and audience
    4. The first typewriter was patented on June 23,1868. They had
    a topicgood run but they are all but out of existence now and convey ideas and information
    2.
    most of your students may never have seen one. Do they even know what a typewriter is? Ask for a show of hands of students who have seen a typewriter. Then ask them to skim the news to find an important invention that they think will be the next to disappear. They should write about their choice.
    5.
    Explain to students that this year summer begins June 21 with the summer vacation fast approaching, it’s a good timesolstice. The solstice (from the Latin sol, or sun, and sistere, to consider waysstand still) is when the Earth’s axis tilts either closer to stay safe. The free timeor further from the sun. In the summer, it’s closer to the sun.
    What signs
    of summer means lots of timeare evident in today’s news? Of those, which are related to play sports, to ride bikes, to shopthe sun and tohow? Have your students do a summer solstice search of the news and write about what they found.
    Common Core Standard: using diverse media
    6. Since summer is
    just have fun. While funabout upon us, it’s a great time to talk about summer safety with your students. Tell them that wearing a seat belt is good it also is importantthe best way to play responsibly. Can students find exampleskeep safe in the news of people who are “playing” responsibly and ofcar. Why do they think some people who are not being safety smart?
    Have
    don’t buckle up? Have them summarize whatlook through the newspaper to see how display ads are designed. They should then create one encouraging people their age to wear seat belts. Or they find.can create an ad about the value of wearing a bike helmet.
    Common Core Standard: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a
    ...
    and information clearly
    Social Studies
    1. Tell students that theShare this history with students. The first woman elected to the U.S. CongressAfrican American Supreme Court Justice was Jeanette Rankin. She was born in 1880Thurgood Marshall, nominated by President Lyndon Johnson on June 11. Before entering Congress, she was a teacher, a seamstress and she studied furniture design. She didn’t have13, 1967. Prior to work because her fatherjoining the Court, Marshall had left her enough money to live whenargued and won a civil rights case before the Supreme Court. Current Supreme Court Justice, Elena Kagan, clerked for Justice Marshall. Marshall said that, as a child, he died. But, on a trip to Boston, she saw people livingwas so badly behaved in poverty andschool that he was distressed and inspiredsent to take up social work. Later, she became interested in women’s rights. In 1916 she won electionthe principal’s office often. There, he’d sometimes have to Congress from Montana. She really ismemorize a fascinating person. Ifpart of the Constitution as punishment. He also said that he memorized the Fourteenth Amendment guaranteeing equal rights but didn’t see those around him. It piqued his interest in the law. Ask your students would like to learn more about her, they should click here
    Ask
    students to look throughclosely at today’s news for any story that might inspire themand to draw a career as witnessingconclusion about the poor peoplestate of Boston did for Rankin. They should summarize the story they chose and explain how it is inspirational.equal rights today.
    Common Core Standard: Integratedrawing conclusions from text
    As follow up, share this quote with students
    and evaluate content
    2. On June 12, 1963, civil rights leader Medgar Evers was shot
    allow them to react:
    Today's Constitution is a realistic document of freedom only because of several corrective amendments. Those amendments speak to a sense of decency
    and killedfairness that I and other Blacks cherish.
    Thurgood Marshall
    4. June 14th is Flag Day. It’s the anniversary of the day
    in front1777 when the Continental Congress approved the adoption of his housethe first American flag. Later, in Jackson, Mississippi. Evers had established chapters1818, it was decided that the number of stripes would stay constant at 13 but that the NAACP and organized boycottsstars would equal the number of states. There are several rules of gas stationsflag “etiquette” that wouldn’t allow African Americans to usedescribe how the flag should be treated with respect. Can your students find any graphics in the news that depict or resemble the flag? Is it being treated with respect? Why or why not?Ask students what they know about the U.S. flag and its history. Record their restrooms. He triedanswers on the board.
    Some historians believe that Betsy Ross sewed the first flag. It may be interesting for students
    to integratevirtually visit the UniversityBetsy Ross house in Philadelphia, PA to learn more.
    The first act about the flag was passed by the Continental Congress on June 14, 1777. It said, “Resolved, That the flag
    of Mississippithe United States be made of thirteen stripes, alternate red and later he investigated violent crimes against African Americans. In addition, he organizedwhite; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a boycott of racist merchantsblue field, representing a new Constellation.”
    Since then, quite a few other resolutions have resulted
    in Jacksonthe flag we have today, representing what matters most to Americans. Although the colors of the flag haven’t been stated to have meaning, they were based on the colors of the country’s first official seal and garnered national attention for it. Whatthat there were meanings attributed to the colors. According to the Continental Congress, white signified purity, red stood for hardiness and valor and blue for vigilance, perseverance and justice.
    Which story in today’s news
    do your students think that suchbest expresses the ideals of America similar to the way the flag represents us? Allow time for a man would think if he could seediscussion.
    A flag should represent something meaningful about a person or a country. Your students may enjoy creating their own flag after thinking about
    what life is likemost important in their lives. Click here for African Americans today? Baseda very cool web tool that will enable students to create their own personal flag based on the informationflags of the world.
    2. Before George Washington was the first President, he lead the Continental Army. He started that command on June 15, 1775. His impressive leadership resulted in his becoming the country’s President. Can your students find an impressive leader
    in today’s news,news? Who is it and what conclusions do they think Evers would draw aboutare that person’s best leadership attributes?
    Common Core Standard: Produce clear and coherent writing in which
    the legacy of his hard workdevelopment and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience
    3. Explain to students that on June 22, 1944, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed
    the hard work ofG.I. Bill into law. It was also known as the Servicemen's Readjustment Act and it was created to help soldiers returning home from World War II. It started a fund to help soldiers get an education and buy a home, as well as a few other civil rights workers? Students can learn more about Evers here.
    A great essay
    benefits. The law has changed over the years but it is still in effect today. Challenge students to imagine that they have just returned home from serving in the military. They should skim the Help Wanted ads to find a job that requires education or training. Have them write letters requesting educational funding aid that could come from the G.I. Bill.
    Common Core Standard: Produce clear and coherent
    writing tool canin which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience
    4. Tell students that astronaut Sally Ride came back to Earth on June 24, 1983 after spending six days in space. She was the first American woman to fly in space. That’s quite an accomplishment but it wasn’t what Ride originally wanted to do. She dropped out of college to
    be found at this link.a professional tennis player! Later, she decided she wasn’t a good enough player and went back to school. Have students skim the Sports section to find an athlete whom they think should quit his/her sport and choose another. Have them write that person a letter explaining why they think he/she should choose another career.
    Common Core Standard: Cite strongProduce clear and thorough textual evidencecoherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to support analysistask, purpose, and audience
    5. On June 27, 1880, outlaw Ned Kelly was captured in Australia. His crimes became legendary. Why do your students think that some crimes are glorified in this way? Can they think
    of whatany “legendary” criminals? Are there crime stories in today’s news that have the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawnmakings of a legend? Have them analyze a crime story and tell whether it is likely to became a piece of history in our culture.
    Common Core Standard: drawing conclusions
    from the text
    6. On June 25, 1947, Anne Frank's diary was published for the first time.In that diary, Anne Frank, a victim of the Holocaust, wrote, “Despite everything, I still believe that people are really good at heart.” Do you agree or disagree? Can you find support for your position in today’s news?
    Common Core Standard: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience

    Lessons written by Deborah Drezon Carroll. Carroll taught for ten years in Philadelphia, PA and is the author of two parenting books. She also coordinated the Newspaper in Education department of the Philadelphia Inquirer for 16 years.
    Copyright Hot Topics Hot Serials. No portions may be distributed digitally without permission.
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    9:33 am

Sunday, June 3

  1. page Newsie K-3 edited ... {NewsFish.jpg} Hi! I'm reading the news. I like to know what is going on in the world. In …
    ...
    {NewsFish.jpg}
    Hi! I'm reading the news. I like to know what is going on in the world.
    In many places in America, school lets our for the summer soon. Can you find a photo of a summer activityFind three headlines in today's news? What donews that you likecan read. Read them aloud to do when you are out of school?a partner.
    Copyright Hot Topics Hot Serials. No portions may be distributed digitally without permission.
    (view changes)
    6:41 am
  2. page Video News Views edited {Video_News_Views.jpg} ... the video. Hurricane season starts June 1. What's There will be m…
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    ...
    the video. Hurricane season starts June 1. What'sThere will be much talk in the weather like where you are? news this week about Trump meeting with the leader of North Korea. Check the news for the latest developments.
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    6:41 am
  3. page Page One Prime edited ... The first page of a newspaper is “prime” real estate. It’s where the most important stories ar…
    ...
    The first page of a newspaper is “prime” real estate. It’s where the most important stories are often found. That’s why it’s helpful to understand what’s behind those stories – because they matter. In some cases, a news story may not receive much attention but it matters because it's interesting. Those, too, are prime stories.
    Here’s some background on a “prime” story this week.
    Weather or Not
    The science
    First Lady?
    While she's not an elected official, the job
    of predicting weathera First Lady, wife to a president, is not always exact. Sometimes the predictions are rightan easy one. People scrutinize her every word and sometimesmove. They watch and comment on what she wears. They expect her to lead an exemplary life, that is to live in a way that is a good role model for others.
    Melania Trump is the First Lady currently. She does
    not make many public appearances or speeches. She has announced her signature program, "Be Best," but so much. But, at this time of year lots of folks keep their eyes onfar has not exactly shown how she plans to put that into action. For the forecast because Hurricane Season starts on June 1. Nolast three weeks, she hasn't been seen in public. It was reported that she had minor surgery and was recuperating but no one toldhas seen her since that time, despite reports that she is fine. It is unusual for a First Lady to the first named stormbe out of the season, though, because "Alberto" is already threatening Florida and the Gulf Coast states.
    What
    public eye for an extended period of time like this.
    So,
    you can be sure ofimagine there is much speculation about where she is that lots of storms will make news between now and the end of Hurricane Seasonwhat she is doing. Keep your eye on November 1.
    Look at today's news and you'll already see stories about Alberto. Watch
    the news for the next few days to see if weather forecasters refer to the beginning of Hurricane Seasonwhere Melania turns up and to see the aftermath of Alberto. Was it as damaging as feared? Not as bad as predicted?what she says about where she's been.
    Why do you think this story makes news?

    Copyright Hot Topics Hot Serials. No portions may be distributed digitally without permission.
    (view changes)
    6:38 am
  4. page Write the News edited {Write_the_News_Logo.jpg} Topic: It’s, Its, and the Apostrophe Catastrophe The letter “s” seem…
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    Topic: It’s, Its, and the Apostrophe Catastrophe
    The letter “s” seems innocent enough, and yet it’s embedded into some glaring grammatical errors.
    First up, it’s and its. These might
    Help Wanted
    With summer fast approaching, many teens may
    be two of the most-often misused words, butlooking for summer jobs. When searching for a job it’s not that hardhelpful to know how to understandwrite a resume. Look through today's newspaper and choose from the difference.
    “It’s” stands
    Help Wanted ads a job for “it is” or “it has.” That’s it. It’s never usedwhich you someday hope to show possession. Ifbe qualified. Think about the qualifications you wantwould have to write, “The dog sat on its pillow,” no apostrophe is needed. Seems simple, doesn’t it? Demonstrate your understanding by using both wordshave in a sentence.
    Next is
    order to get that job. List all of the apostrophe and the letter “s.” Some people think theyqualifications you need an apostrophe, whenand then check those you already possess. Imagine that you have completed preparing all that’s needed is the letter “s.”
    If
    ones you saw this sign in the window ofneed and write a sporting goods store, what would you do?
    “Baseball Bat’s On Sale!”
    Would you go in
    resume for yourself.
    A resume needs to include your personal information (name, age address
    and buy a bat? Or, wouldphone number) your educational background, your employment history and references. (People who know you go in and politely askthat will say good things about you.) A resume is often the owner to remove the apostrophe from the sign? To change the singular “bat” to the plural “bats,” just add an “s.” The apostrophe isn’t needed to createfirst thing a plural noun.
    Show off what you’ve learned. Find two examples
    potential employer will look at in the newspaper of “it’s” or “its.” Explain if the word is used correctly. Then find three plural nouns in the news and write the singular form of each word. Write your answers on the back of this sheet.deciding whether to hire you.
    Copyright Hot Topics Hot Serials. No portions may be distributed digitally without permission.
    (view changes)
    6:33 am
  5. page Lesson Plans edited {Lesson_Plans_A_La_Mode.jpg} Engage students with this week's news, events, and anniversaries. …
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    Engage students with this week's news, events, and anniversaries.
    May 28- June 1,June 4-10, 2018
    Language Arts
    1. IntroduceAsk your students if they enjoy watching cartoons and reading comic strips. What makes those often so engaging are the characters involved. Tell students that Donald Duck was “born” on June 9, 1934. How would they describe his character? Ask them to onewrite a brief character sketch of America’s most beloved poets-- Walt Whitman. Born May 31, 1819, Whitman learned how to beDonald and once they understand the concept, have them choose a printercomic strip character from today’s news and so got interested in words. He later taught and eventually becameto write a journalist, so his lovecharacter sketch of words served him well throughout his life. Yourtheir choice. If students maywould enjoy reading about Whitman and his work. One poem is called “America.” There is a recording online believed to be Whitman reading his work aloud. Firstcreating their own comic strips, have students read the poem and thenthem click here so that students can listenon this link to the poem read by the author. Which is more compelling, reading it themselves or hearing it read aloud? It’s great practice for students to read aloud with feeling. Choosevisit a news story that you find interestingfree website where they can create strips.
    Common Core Standard: Produce clear
    and then invite students to take turns readingcoherent writing in which the paragraphs aloud with great feelingdevelopment and fluency.
    Common Core Standard: summarize text read aloud from diverse media
    2. This time of year commencement speeches -- presentations at graduations -- make news. Celebrities
    organization are often invitedappropriate to colleges to speaktask, purpose, and audience
    2. Author Charles Dickens died on June 9, 1870 but clearly his works live on. According
    to the graduating seniors. They usually try to share life lessons or wisdom. Wheneditors of the late Steve Jobs, founderAmerican Book Review, Dickens’ opening line from the novel, “A Tale of Apple, spoke at Stanford University in 2005, he said,Two Cities” ranks 9th among other things, "Don't let the noiseall-time great opening novel lines. It is, “It was the best of others' opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, havetimes, it was the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become."
    Have students peruse
    worst of times, it was the news to find topics they think would make good themes for graduation speeches. Have them write outlinesage of what they think graduates could learn about those topics.
    Common Core Standard: analyze development
    wisdom, it was the age of text
    3. Share this with students. June is a month known for several things. It’s
    foolishness, it was the startepoch of summer, and it’s a month when lotsbelief, it was the epoch of people get married. That may be because June might be named for Juno,incredulity, it was the Roman goddessseason of love and marriage, so some people think that marriages in June will have lotsLight, it was the season of good luck. June is also sometimes called, “Rose Month,” because roses bloom this month. Challenge yourDarkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair.” Read it to students and then invite them to find an ad or a newsthe best opening line of any story that could only appear in June.today’s news. See the rest of the best lines list here. And, by the way, Dickens also holds the #20 spot for the opening line of David Copperfield.
    Common Core Standard: analyze developmentOrient the reader by establishing a situation and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally
    3. This time
    of text
    4. This activity is
    year there are many graduations. Some of those feature a terrific onefamous person as it involves reading and summarizing the news and using a great online tool which will read their written words aloud by converting written words into spoken words.. Invitecommencement speaker. Ask students to skim the news andimagine that they have been asked to write brief summaries of the three top stories. Then they can usegive a commencement speech this toolweek. Their assignment is to have theiruse today’s news summaries read aloud. They can choose fromas a variety of virtual “readers” and languages. It’s a great lesson and a lot of fun.springboard for information they’d like graduates to think about as they move forward in their lives.
    Common Core Standard: summarize key supporting detailsWrite narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and ideasclear event sequences
    Math
    1. One ofsport that your students might enjoy during the most famous clocks in the worldsummer is Big Ben, which rings out impeccable time in London, England. The hour bell weighs 13 tonsbicycle riding. Have them brainstorm and rang for the first time on May 31, 1859. In honorlist all of Big Ben,the ways they stay safe when they ride a bike. Then, invite studentsthem to write elapsed time problemsgo shopping for a partner to solve, based on the television listingsbikes in the newspaper. Here is an example. “If I start watching the NBC network at 8 PMClassified ads. Tell them to imagine they have $1000 to spend and watch for 75 minutes, what programneed to buy two bicycles. Which bikes will be on when I turn off the TV?”they buy? Why? How much money will they have left over?
    Common Core Standard: work with timeusing authentic data
    2. Henry Ford, founderSummer often brings a large number of garage sales. But, other folks sell their “preowned” items via an ad in the Ford Motor Company, made his first operational car on June 4, 1896. HaveClassified section. Ask students find ads for new Fordsto check out how much an ad costs and then write one to sell something they own that could be used in today’s newspaper. They should find the mean, median and mode of all ofsummer. If they ran their ad for two weeks, what would the advertised prices.cost be? How much would they make selling the item once they paid for the ad?
    Common Core Standard: creating and solving word problems

    Science Literacy
    1. Explain toYour students that radio was patented on June 2, 1896. What technological advance foundhave probably heard U.S. Postal Service mail described as "snail mail" because it is delivered slowly in today’s newspaper do your students considercomparison with email, which is instantaneous. But, have they heard of "missile mail"? On June 8, 1959, the USPS and the Department of Defense worked together to send mail on a missile from Virginia to Florida. Although at the time they thought this fast delivery might be the most importantfuture of mail, it turned out to them personally? Have them choose and item and defend their choicebe a one-time only shot. It was too expensive. Of course, nowadays, email makes it possible to deliver mail faster than any missile could. Just for fun, challenge students to look through the news for a problem that could be solved by using an existing piece of technology in writing.a new way.
    Common Core Standard: using technologyWrite informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information
    2. June 1 marks the beginningExplain to students that with summer vacation fast approaching, it’s a good time to consider ways to stay safe. The free time of hurricane season. Checksummer means lots of time to play sports, to ride bikes, to shop and to just have fun. While fun is good it also is important to play responsibly. Can students find examples in the news for today's forecast. Any mention of any tropical storms or hurricanes? Write aboutpeople who are “playing” responsibly and of some people who are not being safety smart?
    Have them summarize
    what you found.they find.
    Common Core Standard: summarize key supporting detailsWrite informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information
    Social Studies
    1. Explain toTell students that for many people, Memorial Day, celebrated this year on May 29, signifies the kick-off offirst woman elected to the summer season of fun. But Memorial Day has a deeper meaning. ItU.S. Congress was originally called, “Decoration Day,” and itJeanette Rankin. She was born in 1880 on June 11. Before entering Congress, she was set aside as a dayteacher, a seamstress and she studied furniture design. She didn’t have to rememberwork because her father had left her enough money to live when he died. But, on a trip to Boston, she saw people who died servingliving in our country’s military. Some people marked the day by decorating soldiers’ graves.
    It’s now celebrated widely on the last Monday
    poverty and was distressed and inspired to take up social work. Later, she became interested in May.women’s rights. In order1916 she won election to connect with the meaning of this holiday, haveCongress from Montana. She really is a fascinating person. If your students complete each of these sentences.
    Patriotism means…
    It’s important
    would like to honor our nation’s soldiers because…
    We fight wars because…
    Freedom is not free…
    Then
    learn more about her, they should find aclick here
    Ask students to look through today’s
    news for any story relatedthat might inspire them to veterans in some waya career as witnessing the poor people of Boston did for Rankin. They should summarize the story they chose and summarize it.explain how it is inspirational.
    Common Core Standard: Using appropriate language, report on a topic or text or provide a narrative in an organized manner
    2. Offer these thoughts to spur discussion in your class during this week including Memorial Day. One of America’s most trusted
    Integrate and revered leaders is former Secretary of Stateevaluate content
    2. On June 12, 1963, civil rights leader Medgar Evers was shot
    and retired four-star generalkilled in the U.S. Army, Colin Powell. He has served his country for muchfront of his life. General Powell is not alonehouse in Jackson, Mississippi. Evers had established chapters of the NAACP and organized boycotts of gas stations that mission. Every day, thousands ofwouldn’t allow African Americans serveto use their countryrestrooms. He tried to makeintegrate the world a better place. They endeavor to keep America, as it says in The Star-Spangled Banner, “the landUniversity of the freeMississippi and the homelater he investigated violent crimes against African Americans. In addition, he organized a boycott of the brave.”
    Military service is not a requirement for citizenship. It is a choice
    racist merchants in Jackson and it’s notgarnered national attention for everyone. It wasn’t alwaysit. What do your students think that such a choice. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed the Selective Training and Service Act in 1940. It was the country’s first peacetime draft. From 1948 – 1973, when there weren’t enough people volunteeringman would think if he could see what life is like for African Americans today? Based on the armed forces, the government could “draft” or call young men to mandatory service. It was the law. That all changedinformation in 1973 whentoday’s news, what conclusions do they think Evers would draw about the draft endedlegacy of his hard work and the U.S. military became an all-volunteer organization.
    Pose this question to students:
    Do you think America’s military should be a draft system or a volunteer organization? Why? Who should serve?
    3. On June 4, 1989, hundreds
    hard work of protestors were killed by government soldiers in Tiananmen Square in Beijing, China. A photo taken on June 5 became the iconic symbol of that massacre which was started by student protestors.
    Your students
    other civil rights workers? Students can view the photolearn more about Evers here. Which photo in today’s news do your students think best represents the story it accompanies? Why?
    A great essay writing tool can be found at this link.

    Common Core Standard: integrating visual information with writtenCite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text
    Lessons written by Deborah Drezon Carroll. Carroll taught for ten years in Philadelphia, PA and is the author of two parenting books. She also coordinated the Newspaper in Education department of the Philadelphia Inquirer for 16 years.
    Copyright Hot Topics Hot Serials. No portions may be distributed digitally without permission.
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