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Saturday, February 10

  1. page Activity Sheet edited ... click download. {Graphing for Equality.pdf} {Graphing for Equality.jpg} {The Arc of th…

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    click download. {Graphing for Equality.pdf}
    {Graphing for Equality.jpg}
    {The Arc of the Moral Universe.pdf}
    {The Arc of the Moral Universe.jpg}

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  2. page From the Core edited ... {From_the_Core_2.jpg} Read the selection and take the quiz to see how well you read. Go to h…
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    {From_the_Core_2.jpg}
    Read the selection and take the quiz to see how well you read. Go to http://www.yourdictionary.com to find the meaning of any word.
    TheKing Continues the Work
    After the success of the
    March on Washington
    The movement had tough years from 1960 to 1963.
    Washington, King was its spokesmandecided to keep going. As freedom schools and voter registration drives continued, he traveled the pressure of that role was hard on him. Although there were other leaderscountry and other groups, King, withthe world speaking of the movement. He branched out, linking his great speech-making talentideas about civil rights to larger issues, such as the Vietnam War and his many TV appearances,the troubles of poor people. This was inrisky, and King did lose some support because of those issues. But he kept working.
    There were triumphs, too. The anger over
    the spotlightviolence led Congress to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Freedom Summer brought hundreds of new civil rights workers into the South to register voters and to teach. More and more blacks were demanding an end to segregation in housing and more. He continued focusing on nonviolent resistance, whichother aspects of their life. In 1965, the Voting Rights Act was something many Americans found intriguing. Although they were familiar with rebellions, non-violent protests – talking about “love” while challenging how things were – were new.
    A lot was happening – but not much was changing. King wrote another book. He raised money for
    passed. Across the cause. He took part in a movement in Birmingham where heNorth, cities slowly changed housing codes and other laws that discriminated. Congress was arrested.debating an "Open Housing Act" that would end discrimination in housing.
    King experienced some personal triumphs as well.
    He was working on the book, Letters From A Birmingham Jail,cover of Time magazine and, while in jail,1964, he received messages from John F. Kennedy, who would later be elected president. Civil rights workersbecame the youngest person to win the Nobel Peace Prize. He met with the President. In some ways, his message was being recognized.
    But by 1967 “Black Power”
    had been murdered,become the cry of new student groups that did not embrace King’s idea of an integrated, nonviolent movement. Groups such as the Black
    Panthers talked about armed defense. There were protests against the Vietnam War that turned violent, and several political groups
    had Medgar Evers, a major leadercome out in favor of violent revolution. Even one of King’s marches turned violent, something that had never happened before.
    King was troubled by
    the Mississippi NAACP. Beatings, mass arrests,violence. He continued to argue that issues of the war, civil rights, and countless marches occurred across mucheconomic justice were connected. He criticized the war as a waste of resources that could be better spent at home. He spoke about housing discrimination, slum neighborhoods, and the country. But segregation was stillpoverty of much of b lack America. This made many of his former supporters angry, but he spoke out anyway. He took part in a facthousing demonstration in many places.
    Civil rights leaders figured that something big was needed. They decided on
    Chicago, spoke at anti-war rallies, and thought of organizing a massive march on Washington. It was"Poor People’s Campaign" to highlight problems of poverty.
    President Lyndon Johnson had made wiping out poverty
    a risky proposition. The Kennedygoal of his administration, the Washington, D.C., police, and civil rights leaders themselves were afraid of rioting. But the leaders knewKing felt that the
    ...
    was right for a major event. In Detroit, 125,000 people had marched peacefullyto address the issue. He introduced his "Poor People’s Campaign" with King after Medgar Evers’ murder. They decidedan announcement that he would lead another "March on Washington," this one to go ahead.
    The March
    try to collect money to fight poverty. He also got involved with sanitation workers striking in Memphis, Tenn.The sanitation workers, mostly black, had been on Washingtonstrike for a while. For King, this was held on August 28, 1963. Tens of thousands of people took part — people of different backgrounds, from all parts ofa situation that illustrated the country, andissues of all occupations. There were labor leaders, Hollywood celebrities, folk singers, civil rights workers, students, religiouseconomic and racial justice. He traveled to Memphis, met with strike leaders, and more. More than 300,000 people attended one of the largest mass meetings in the nation’s history. Laborled a march. He also spoke at a church rally and religious leadersgave a speech that seemed to predict his own death. He spoke of having been to “the mountaintop,” referred to the unity of their cause“promised land,” and said, “I may not get there with you.” It was one of his most powerful sermons.
    On April 4, 1968, while King was standing on
    the civil rights movement. Celebrities spokebalcony of a “new day dawning.” But the day belongedLorraine Hotel in Memphis, a shot rang out. King fell. Aides rushed to help him. King and his famous “I Havewas taken to a Dream” speech.
    Each speaker
    nearby hospital where he was to have only 7 minutes. But halfway through his 7 minutes, King began to preach. He talked about not giving in to the “valleypronounced dead. The most influential black American of despair” and urged people to continue the struggle. He talked aboutprevious 20 years had been killed by an assassin’s bullet. The police arrested a dream — mixing Bible quotes with quotes fromman named James Earl Ray, who was convicted of the song “America.”crime. He asked for freedom to “ring … fromlater claimed his innocence, and many people still say the hilltops of New Hampshire … fromcrime has not been solved.
    Shock and anger filled
    the Stone Mountainnation’s black communities. Many communities broke out in Georgia.”riots, which went against what King had believed. Neighborhoods burned, cars were overturned, and stores were looted. It was a speech that moved everyonesad time. The man who heard it to cheerhad preached nonviolence and cry. The March on Washington succeeded. Civil rightshad helped change a nation was gone, and it seemed that his dream for all were going to be reality.nonviolence had died with him.
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  3. page Video News Views edited {Video_News_Views.jpg} ... drought in a major African city. Cape Town, South Africa. What d…
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    drought in a major African city.Cape Town, South Africa. What do
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    this story? Can you think of ways you could or would use less water if you lived there?
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    9:48 am
  4. page Video News Views edited {Video_News_Views.jpg} ... video about an athlete being included a severe drought in the H…
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    video about an athlete being includeda severe drought in the Hall of Fame. Cana major African city. What do you find someone inthink is the news who should bemost important lesson in a Hall of Fame someday?this story?
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    9:48 am
  5. page Newsie K-3 edited ... {NewsFish.jpg} Hi! I'm reading the news. I like to know what is going on in the world ... …
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    {NewsFish.jpg}
    Hi! I'm reading the news. I like to know what is going on in the world
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    Black History Month. FindMonth and it has Valentine's Day and President's Day. Can you find a photo or news story that would make a good lesson to help students learn about this.symbol of one of these celebrations in the news? Draw it and then design one of your own.
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  6. page Write the News edited {Write_the_News_Logo.jpg} Topic: Run-On Sentences If Goldilocks gave sentence-writing advice,…
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    Topic: Run-On Sentences
    If Goldilocks gave sentence-writing advice, she might say, “Don’t make them too long; don’t make them too short; make them just right.” If your sentences
    Stop!
    Exclamation marks or points (!)
    are too long, known as run-on sentences,used when a writer wants to show strong feelings. Similar to using ALL CAPS when texting or messaging, exclamation points are like shouting when you may lose the reader’s attention. If your sentencesspeak. They are too short, yourrarely used in newspapers because they are more appropriate for informal writing. It’s fine to use them when writing may sound childish. If they’re just right, you say what you needfriendly e-mails, letters, texts, or tweets. When trying to use fewer words, it’s okay to say, getrely on punctuation to your subjects and verbs quickly, and move on.
    Begin by knowing what makes a good sentence. A sentence has a subject—the person place or thing doing the action, a verb—the action, and a complete idea.
    Here’s an example:
    I opened the door.
    Subject = I Verb = opened
    Does it have a complete idea? Yes. It’s a complete sentence.
    If you just wrote, “I opened,” that would not
    express feeling.
    But, in more formal writing, exclamation points may
    be a sentence because it doesn’t have a complete idea. It leaves the reader hanginglazy way to finddescribe emotion.
    Writer F. Scott Fitzgerald said, “Cut
    out what you opened.
    Here’s an example
    all these exclamation points. An exclamation point is like laughing at your own joke.”
    Author Elmore Leonard wrote, “You are allowed no more than two or three per 100,000 words
    of a run-on sentence:
    I opened the door, looked inside the room, and saw that there was no
    prose.” That means about one in there,per novel.
    Why were these talented writers
    so I closed the door and walkeddown on this punctuation mark? Perhaps it is because they knew that good writers “show” rather than “tell.” They use words to convey meaning rather than count on the next roompunctuation to see who was inside.
    Yes, it has subject and verb, but it has too many ideas. It doesn’t tell
    do the reader where to stop, pause, and go tojob. And overuse of the next idea.
    It could be fixed this way:
    I opened the door
    exclamation mark cuts down on its meaning and looked inside. There was no one in there. I closed the door and walked to the next roomits impact.
    Look carefully
    to see who was there.
    Are
    if you guilty of writing sentences that are too long? Find out. Choose a page of your writing. Count the wordscan find any exclamation marks in each sentence. Average is 8-15 words.today’s newspaper. If you have too many longfind one, see if you can figure out why it was used.
    Rewrite each of these
    sentences, 20replacing the exclamation marks with words or more, you probably need to write shorter sentences. For practice, find a few long sentences in today’s newspaper. Copythat convey the meaning intended. Use “muscular” language with strong verbs and rewrite themnouns.
    I was rejected from the college I wanted
    to make them shorter.attend!
    Don’t use too many exclamation points!!
    There was an accident!

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  7. page Page One Prime edited ... The first page of a newspaper is “prime” real estate. It’s where the most important stories ar…
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    The first page of a newspaper is “prime” real estate. It’s where the most important stories are often found. That’s why it’s helpful to understand what’s behind those stories – because they matter. In some cases, a news story may not receive much attention but it matters because it's interesting. Those, too, are prime stories.
    Here’s some background on a “prime” story this week.
    Does Truth Matter?
    Donald Trump made news this week by sending out a tweet of 47 words. One analyst said that in those few words there were
    A Break From Politics
    For
    at least four falsehoods, four things presented as fact bya year, nothing has dominated the President of the United Statesnews like politics. While that were not verifiable as true.
    Does this matter? Do you believe it's important
    is good in some ways, showing that people care about what's going on in the country's leaders tellcountry, it's also probably a good idea from time to time to take a break from the truth? How might it help or hurt the country ifchaos in our leaders are not always reliable information deliverers?
    Is it okay for politicians
    political scene.
    So, it's the perfect time
    to give their pointturn your "news" attention to something entirely different for a while. The opening ceremonies of viewthe Olympic Games In Pyeongchang, South Korea, were held on February 9, 2018. Athletes come from the far corners of the world to compete.
    Check the
    news stories as present their pointsand choose a story of view as fact?
    What do you think? Can
    one sport you find examples in today's news of trustworthy politicians?interesting. Summarize what you read.
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  8. page Lesson Plans edited ... Engage students with this week's news, events, and anniversaries. Each week we offer a civics…
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    Engage students with this week's news, events, and anniversaries.
    Each week we offer a civics lesson to help students understand how our government works: Here's this week's lesson:
    Civics Check Up
    A survey conducted in 2015 showed that two-thirds of Americans could not name the three branches of government. How does your class stack up? Ask
    Authority
    Invite
    students to write down the namesthink about some of the three branches. Allowrules they follow each studentday in school. Ask them to sharelist the answers. What percentpeople of your class could nameauthority in school. Have them consider what might happen in school if there were no people with authority. What if all three? After sharing the correct answers, invite students to find an examplepeople in charge were certainly not there? Allow time for a discussion.
    Then have them consider who are the people
    of each government branchauthority in our society. Who are the people involved with making laws, enforcing laws, the people who have anything to do with laws, courts, education, etc. How would we know what our rights were? Would we have rights? Who would enforce them?
    Students should understand that authority empowers people to provide order and security to people. They are
    the news.people who manage conflicts peacefully and fairly and protect rights and freedoms.
    Feb. 12-23, 2018
    Language Arts
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    9:36 am
  9. page Lesson Plans edited ... Civics Check Up A survey conducted in 2015 showed that two-thirds of Americans could not name…
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    Civics Check Up
    A survey conducted in 2015 showed that two-thirds of Americans could not name the three branches of government. How does your class stack up? Ask students to write down the names of the three branches. Allow each student to share the answers. What percent of your class could name all three? After sharing the correct answers, invite students to find an example of each government branch in the news.
    Feb. 5-9,12-23, 2018
    Language Arts
    1. ForAnother great writer for students to meet as part of Black History Month,Month is Maya Angelou. Students can go online to learn more about Angelou http://mayaangelou.com but you can also share this week we highlight the workbit of writer Eloise Greenfield. And,biographical information before they read the poem. Angelou grew up in extreme poverty. A brutal attack left her speechless for years. She became a mother in her teens and went on to careers as a bonus, this week’s selectiondancer, an actress, an activist and, of course, a poet and author. She was chosen to write and perform the inaugural speech for President Bill Clinton.
    Here
    is about another heroinean excerpt of Black History, Harriet Tubman. Invite yourher poem, "Still I Rise." Allow students to read this poem aloud, perhaps alternating lines among students. Allow time for a discussionit and talk about its meaning.
    Out
    of what the poem is about. Ms. Greenfield said that ashuts of history's shame
    I rise
    Up from
    a poet, she took license withpast that's rooted in pain
    I rise
    I'm a black ocean, leaping and wide,
    Welling and swelling I bear in
    the styletide.
    Leaving behind nights
    of writingterror and fear
    I rise
    Into a daybreak that's wondrously clear
    I rise
    Bringing
    the ability to “break the rules” of formal writing. She feelsgifts that my ancestors gave,
    I am
    the poem has a stronger impact withdream and the opening lines, ‘“Harriet Tubman didn’t take no stuff
    Wasn’t scared
    hope of nothing neither,”’
    rather than if she had written “Harriet Tubman didn’t accept any abuse. She wasn’t afraid of anything either.”
    Talk about
    the slave.
    I rise
    I rise
    I rise.
    Why do your students think
    that with students. Then invite themPresident Clinton chose Angelou to choosewrite his inaugural poem? If your students were elected president and rewrite several newspaper headlinesthey had to chose one person in today's news to make a less formal wayspeech or to givewrite a poem for the wordsinaugural event, whom would they chose and why? As a stronger impact.
    “Harriet Tubman”
    bonus, here's a poem by Eloise Greenfield
    Harriet Tubman didn’t take no stuff
    Wasn’t scared of nothing neither
    Didn’t come in this world
    song, Rise Up. Play it and allow students to be no slave
    And wasn’t going
    compare the lyrics to stay one either
    “Farewell!” she sang
    Angelou's poem.
    Common Core Standard: drawing conclusions
    2. This lesson teaches students argument mapping. This activity is terrific for helping students build an “argument” with supporting details. Assign them
    to her friends one night
    She was mighty sad
    choose an issue from today’s news to leave ‘em
    But she ran away that dark, hot night
    Ran looking
    debate. They should draw facts and details from the news to support their side. If students have computer access, you may want them to go online to use this fantastic free tool for her freedom
    She ran
    creating an “amap,” or argument map. The tool enables students to the woodstake a position and she ran through the woods
    With that slave catchers right behind her
    And she kept on going till she got
    to fill in supporting details to create the North
    Where those mean men couldn’t find her
    Nineteen times she went back South
    To get three hundred others
    She ran for her freedom nineteen times
    To save Black sisters
    map. It’s very cool and brothers
    Harriet Tubman didn’t take no stuff
    Wasn’t scared of nothing neither
    Didn’t come into this world
    easy to be no slave
    And didn’t stay one either
    And didn’t stay
    use. You can choose a simple topic like which is the funniest comic strip or a more weighty one eitherlike whether President Obama is doing a good job.
    Common Core Standard: read and comprehend poetry
    2. On February 6, 1964,
    determine the British and French governments announcedmain idea of informative text
    3. Congratulate your students. They have just signed
    a plan to buildbook deal. They are writing a tunnel under the English Channel, connecting Great Britain to France. It was finally openedbook based on a story in 1994. It istoday’s newspaper. Each student should design a book jacket telling the longest undersea tunnel in the world, 31 miles long with 24title of those under the water. In honor of that anniversary, invite studentsbook and what it is about. If they’d like to find other superlatives increate the news. For example, have them find the person with the best smile, the highest basketball score, the funniest comic strip, the most important news story, etc.
    Common
    jacket online, they can click here.
    Common
    Core Standard: form and use superlative adjectives
    3. Google Art Project is a fantastic online virtual tour of 17 art museums around the world. It allows
    technology to produce and publish writing
    4. Ask
    your students to explore thousands of art treasures andbrainstorm things that they can even zoom in to see more detail.think are worth preserving. They don’t have to have an accountcould be landmarks or signinstitutions in to use it unless they want to create their own “collection” and then a sign in will be required. Here is an activity they can do connecting the newspaper with art.your community or even personal items. Have them visitlocate five items in the Museum Kampa and scroll down throughnews that they believe are worthwhile for preservation. They should write an essay about the titles of the works untilthings they come to the word titled “Revolution.” Allow timechose along with justification for each.
    Common Core Standard: draw conclusions
    6. With Presidents Day (Feb. 19) comes
    a discussion of what this painting may be about. Ask them which of our First Amendment rights is being portrayed here. Then, send themfun writing activity. Invite students to read some of the newspaperHelp Wanted ads to find an article that relatessee how they are written. Discuss the way in which some wayads may include a brief description of the job and the character attributes needed to this work. Can they finddo the job. Then have each student write and read aloud a news photo that resembles this work? Allow timeHelp Wanted ad for a discussion.
    Students can read more about
    president. Do they think the artist of that painting here.current president has what it takes?
    Common Core Standard: integrate diverse mediadrawing conclusions
    Math
    1. Working with Roman Numerals? Here’s a good practice activity, based on data your studentsYou can findinvite students to pull facts from the news that lend themselves to graphing (e.g., the sports statistics, jobs in the newspaper. Begin by explaining or remindingHelp Wanted ads, homes for sale). Assign students thatto collect the numbers we use are called Arabic numerals. They were likely created by Indian mathematiciansdata and later used by Arab mathematicians and then by thoseto create a bar, line, or picture graph to depict that information.
    Common Core Standard: create a graph to represent data
    2. The first telephone book was published
    in Europe. Romans used what we call Roman numerals. HaveNew Haven, Connecticut on February 21, 1878. Do your students useeven know what a telephone book is? Allow time for a survey and a show of hands. In honor of the weather informationoccasion, direct students to findlook through the advertisements for five phone numbers that have different area codes. (No 800 numbers please.) They should make a list of temperatures across the country. They can pick ten cities and put them in ordernumbers from coldestless to warmest. Then, have them rewrite each temperature in Roman Numerals. There’s a cool online toolmore. Then they can useresearch online to check their work, too. Click here for a site that converts Arabicfind the locations of each area code. It may be interesting to Roman numerals.poll the class to find out how many students have ever seen a phone book. Ask why students think phone books aren't as popular and as ubiquitous as they once were.
    Common Core Standard: using numeralswork with data relevant to represent amounts
    2. Here’s
    everyday life
    3. Skip counting is
    a great way to havefor students practice estimation. The mission is to estimate how many words are inlearn to compute and it even helps reinforce the lead story onlearning of the front page. Before they begin, havetimes tables. For a unique skip counting challenge, ask them brainstorm methods they could use to getskip count by 3s through the most accurate estimation. Utilizing onenewspaper and write down the first word on each landing page.
    Common Core Standard: use a variety
    of counting strategies
    4. The students can use
    the methods discussed, have them estimate. You may wantClassified ads to createfurnish a graph showingnew apartment with pre-owned items. That’s great for the guesses of everyone inenvironment and affordable, too. First, have them estimate the class. Then assign several studentsamount they’ll need to do an exact count ofspend and then have them “go shopping” in the ads. They should find the best deal on home furnishings and appliances and total the wordsamount they’d need to see which estimation method worked best.spend on a one-bedroom apartment. Was their total more or less than they estimated? Who in your class got the most bang for the buck?
    Common Core Standard: use mental estimation strategiesunderstand quantities in economic situations
    Science Literacy
    1. ItIn order for students to understand how the physical or behavioral characteristics of organisms help them to survive their environments, it may be
    ...
    have students look throughmake observations using the Business sectionnewspaper. Have them choose several photographs of related storiespeople and jot down three ways they are adapting to find an exampletheir environment.
    Common Core Standard: understanding the characteristics
    of a business developmentorganisms
    2. Tell students
    that could have an impact on February 18, 1960, the environment. Have them write an essayVIIIth Winter Olympic Games began in Squaw Valley, California although for a time it looked like it might not happen. The problem? There wasn’t enough snow for or against the development based on its environmental impact.events. They actually hired Indian dancers to do a snow dance! Alas, it rained instead. Finally it snowed just before opening day. But, the opening ceremonies were held up for another reason. They needed to wait for then Vice President Richard Nixon to come and open the games but bad weather delayed his flight. Weather impacts the news often. Ask your students to find a story in today’s news where events are being affected by weather. They should write about what they found. They can also check out this year's coverage of the games.
    Common Core Standard: draw conclusions in lightCite specific textual evidence to support analysis of information and knowledge
    2.These days
    science texts
    3. Do
    your students might hear the word “organic” quite a bit. They might notthink it’s important to be as familiarscientifically literate? Ask them to work in groups, with its antonym, “synthetic.” Althougheach group using a different section of the differences are complex, put simply, organic means somethingnewspaper, to find any article that relates to science in some way. Ask each group to summarize each story they find and to present their findings to the class. This lesson will show students the wide application of science and how it is derived from nature while synthetic means somethingrelevant to their everyday lives.
    Common Core Standard: evaluate content
    4. Some experts say
    that is human-made. Assign studentsin the future people will be able to find five exampleseat and take vitamins and supplements that are exactly matched to the needs of eachtheir individual systems. Scientists are studying the way metabolism works in order to better understand how food affects the newspaper. Whichbody. Once the understanding is easierclearer, they will be able to find? Why?advice people how to eat based on a personal profile. Share this information with students and then ask them to skim the newspaper to find other aspects of health that they would like to see scientists learn more about. They should write essays about their hopes for the future of science in their lives.
    Common Core Standard: evaluatingproduce clear and interpreting source textcoherent writing with a purpose
    Social Studies
    1. On February 5, 2002, John Walker Lindh,1.Valentine’s Day has a young American, was broughtrich and interesting history. Invite students to click here to learn more about it. Then, send them into the newspaper to identify a grand jury. He was suspectedstory about love. They should summarize the story and write a definition of being trained by Osama bin Laden’s networklove based on the main ideas of terrorists after hethe article they chose.
    Common Core Standard: synthesize evidence
    2. An old letter
    was captured fighting fordiscovered sometime during the Taliban armylast few years. A former slave wrote it to his previous master. The master had written to the slave asking him to return to work. Share this story with students as part of Afghanistan. He pled guiltyyour Black History lessons this month. Click here to two chargesread this compelling letter.
    Common Core Standard: Using primary*
    and is serving a 20-year sentence in jail. What do your students think should happensecondary sources* to Americans who fight against their country? Can they find someone in today’s news who would be consideredexamine an enemyhistorical account about an issue of the United States? Have them research online to learn more about the person they chose.time,
    3.
    It may be interesting for students to usehave students compare the archive tooladvantages and disadvantages of getting news from print newspapers versus their online counterparts. Begin by asking students where they get their news. Where do their parents get news? Introduce the e-editionconcept of print and online newspapers. Ask students to think about the advantages and disadvantages of each. They should look up articlesthrough the newspaper for ideas about Edward Snowden. Is he an enemy orhow they are the United States orsame and different. Which is heeasier to read? Which is easier to obtain? Which is more environmentally friendly? They can make a patriot?T-chart of the pros and cons and then share their responses with the class. If possible, bring some print copies to class so that students can compare those to the online version. As a follow-up to the lesson, invite students to write letters to the editor voicing their opinions on improvements they’d like to see in the product they prefer.
    Common Core Standard: evaluating contentthe use and credibility of textmedia
    Bonus Question
    for comparison purposes
    2. Explain
    Debate: If the newspaper’s responsibility is to students that onbe the “first draft of history” or the “watchdog of government,” or even the “town crier” of community events, does one format lend itself to those tasks better than the other? Why?
    4.
    February 9, 1861, Jefferson Davis was chosen19 is Presidents’ Day this year. What do your students think are the attributes of a good president? Discuss the powers assigned to the President in the Constitution as described here:
    The President shall
    be presidentCommander in Chief of the Confederate StatesArmy and Navy of America. That was a groupthe United States, and of seven states-- Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina,the Militia of the several States, when called into the actual Service of the United States; he may require the Opinion, in writing, of the principal Officer in each of the executive Departments, upon any subject relating to the Duties of their respective Offices, and Texas-- that had seceded or separated fromhe shall have Power to Grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offenses against the United StatesStates, except in Cases of America. As your students know, that Confederacy ceased//Impeachment//.
    He shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate,
    to existmake Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present //concur//; and he shall nominate, and by and with the endAdvice and Consent of the Civil WarSenate, shall appoint Ambassadors, other public Ministers and Consuls, Judges of the supreme Court, and all other Officers of the United States, whose Appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by Law: but the Congress may by Law vest the Appointment of such inferior Officers, as they think proper, in 1865. Askthe President alone, in the Courts of Law, or in the Heads of Departments.
    The President shall have Power to fill up all Vacancies that may happen during the Recess of the Senate, by granting Commissions which shall expire at the End of their next Session.
    Then ask
    students to think about howfind the person in today’s newspaper might be different ifnews who would make the Confederacy still existed. Which stories dobest president. If they thinkdon’t choose the current president, have them compare the person they wouldn’t see? They should choose twoselected to him and write aboutexplain why they wouldn’t exist if America had split in two permanently.their choice would be better for the job.
    Common Core Standard: Report on a topic or text orStandards: present an opinion, sequencing ideas logicallyfindings and using appropriate factssupporting evidence, develop and relevant
    3. On February 10, 1897, The New York Times newspaper began using
    strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing
    5. This is
    a slogan, “All the News That’s Fitfascinating way to Print.” What do yourteach students thinkabout plagiarism. Tell them that means? Is there any newson February 19, 1981, former Beatle George Harrison was ordered to pay a record company $587,000 for “subconscious plagiarism.” One of his songs, “My Sweet Lord,” was found to have three chords in common with an older song, “He’s So Fine.” It wasn’t so much that the newspapercourt thought Harrison actually stole the riff but that it was in the back of his mind, perhaps, and he used it. Talk to your students about using information they don’t think is “fitfind online and about how to print?” Havebe sure they are not stealing someone else’s work. For practice, have them find out if your local newspaper haschoose a sloganparagraph from today’s news and comparerewrite it in their own words. Allow each student to read his/her paragraph aloud and contrasthave the two.class determine whether they think it’s too close to the original. They can click here to view an online tool that detects plagiarism. They may want to plug in a piece they've written to see how it fares.
    Common Core Standard: Integratecontrasting and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and mediasynthesizing
    Lessons written by Deborah Drezon Carroll. Carroll taught for ten years in Philadelphia, PA and is the author of two parenting books. She also coordinated the Newspaper in Education department of the Philadelphia Inquirer for 16 years.
    Copyright Hot Topics Hot Serials. No portions may be distributed digitally without permission.
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    9:27 am

Sunday, February 4

  1. page Lesson Plans edited ... And didn’t stay one either Common Core Standard: read and comprehend poetry 2. This lesson …
    ...
    And didn’t stay one either
    Common Core Standard: read and comprehend poetry
    2. This lesson teaches students argument mapping. This activity is terrific for helping students build an “argument” with supporting details. Assign them to choose an issue from today’s news to debate. They should draw facts and details from the news to support their side. If students have computer access, you may want them to go online to use this fantastic free tool for creating an “amap,” or argument map. The tool enables students to take a position and to fill in supporting details to create the map. It’s very cool and easy to use. You can choose a simple topic like which is the funniest comic strip or a more weighty one like whether President Obama is doing a good job.
    Common Core Standard: determine the main idea of informative text
    3.
    On February
    Common Core Standard: form and use superlative adjectives
    Google3. Google Art Project
    Students can read more about the artist of that painting here.
    Common Core Standard: integrate diverse media
    ...
    3. On February 10, 1897, The New York Times newspaper began using a slogan, “All the News That’s Fit to Print.” What do your students think that means? Is there any news in the newspaper that they don’t think is “fit to print?” Have them find out if your local newspaper has a slogan and compare and contrast the two.
    Common Core Standard: Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse formats and media
    3. In honor of Lincoln’s birthday next week on February 12, invite students to listen to the words of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. They should take note of the last sentence where he speaks about the government we should have. Do your students think we have that type of government? Challenge them to look through the newspaper for proof that the government Lincoln described did or did not “perish from the Earth.” They should write an essay giving their opinion and their proof.
    Common core standard: form reasoned judgment

    Lessons written by Deborah Drezon Carroll. Carroll taught for ten years in Philadelphia, PA and is the author of two parenting books. She also coordinated the Newspaper in Education department of the Philadelphia Inquirer for 16 years.
    Copyright Hot Topics Hot Serials. No portions may be distributed digitally without permission.
    (view changes)
    7:08 am

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